An Emirates 777 aircraft crash landed at Dubai Airport but what could have been a terrible tragedy resulted in a swift evacuation of the aircraft in 45 seconds with all onboard safe on the ground.

Life-Saving Training

We don’t want to imagine accident scenarios which might endanger the lives of passengers, but that is what emergency training is for, and Emirates has some of the best training facilities in the world.

I know this because I have seen them and observed evacuation practices. The have cabin simulators for severe turbulence and onboard fires, which cabin crew must routinely train in, as well as a full-sized wave pool to practice water landings. All of the equipment is state of the art.

The priority placed on routine emergency exercises, as required of all carriers  around the world, can make all the difference as was proven today. Say what you will about accommodating cabin crew trained to provide excellent service, when these same crew are trained to command in an emergency the results are evident.

Today’s event proves that Emirates not only values its brand experience, it values the safety of its operations enough to properly train and empower their crew.

Emirates and the emergency services at Dubai Airport are to be commended for saving the lives of all onboard EK521.

 

6 thoughts

  1. What exceptional training? I trained with EK. I had to shout “leave everything, come this way, jump and slide!” from the top of my lungs to pass the course. In a simulator. Yes that’s good training, but exceptional? I’m not sure.
    All this proves is that they were sufficiently trained in the evacuation procedure, which is not that complicated, and can be completed in one or two days. Frankly, not being trained on that would be exceptionally bad. But I would expect any airline that deserve the title, especially one with the size and resources of emirates, to provide evacuation training to the crew.
    I don’t see what’s so exceptional. Drivers should know how to drive, chefs should know how to cook, but if flight attendants know how to evacuate a plane, then that’s EXCEPTIONAL?

    Like

  2. What exceptional training? I trained with EK. I had to shout “leave everything, come this way, jump and slide!” from the top of my lungs to pass the course. In a simulator. Yes that’s good training, but exceptional? I’m not sure.
    All this proves is that they were sufficiently trained in the evacuation procedure, which is not that complicated, and can be completed in one or two days. Frankly, not being trained on that would be exceptionally bad.
    I would expect any airline that deserve the title, especially one with the size and resources of emirates, to provide evacuation training to the crew. I don’t see what’s so exceptional in that. Drivers should know how to drive, chefs should know how to cook, but if flight attendants know how to evacuate a plane, then that’s EXCEPTIONAL?

    Like

    1. Fair enough. Such training is a basic requirement of the job, but I have been impressed by their training facility and Cabin Safety leadership. Equally so with the standard maintained by Singapore Airlines, I must say.

      All airlines are required to adhere to best practices and this statement was not intended to belittle what other airlines do. These two airlines I mention are hardly alone, but the training facilities at both of these airlines are very good.

      I disagree with you that the training is not that complicated. It is also not a couple of days, but requires recurring training.

      I should also say that evacuating an aircraft of this type in 45 seconds is pretty exceptional.

      Let’s remember that was half the time of the required 90 seconds and that passengers being passengers kept insisting on carrying their bags with them. Cabin crew remained calm, but took command and got the job done.

      It’s one thing to go through simulations and quite another for the training to have set in so well that things happen as they should when they should–in a real life or death situation. Two days of introductory instructions do not accomplish that. Recurring training and high expectations from recruiters and the Cabin Safety leadership do.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s